Damsels in Distress

Competitive, Cooperative or Solitaire card game for 1 to 4 players

The sinister Baron Totter Von Fink is up to his old tricks again!  He’s kidnapped dozens of innocent maidens and put them into increasingly bizarre and deadly predicaments simply for his own amusement!  It’s up to you, the Hero to save these poor Damsels from certain death.  And like any good champion of justice, you’ve got to save them just in the nick of time!

In Damsels in Distress the players each take on the role of a Hero trying to save the Damsels from certain death just as their Dangers count down to zero.  Each Damsel card is randomly paired with a Danger card.  On every turn those Dangers count down toward zero, and death for the poor Damsel.  As the Heroes the players must play their cards strategically to push those counts up or down, hopefully bringing the coutn to zero before the end of their turn so they can save the Damsel.

The game is usually played competitively with each Hero focused on his own score, and any dead Damsels counting against him.  The game can also be played cooperatively, with all Heroes working together to save all of the Damsels.  You can even play it on your own as a solitaire game, running one Hero back and forth to rescue all of the poor maidens and foiling the Baron’s plans.

Game Features:

40 unique Damsels to save
25 unique Dangers to face
4 different decks of 7 Hero cards
1 bonus Villain deck – play as the Baron!

– Rob

All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 8: Interview with Chris Kirkman from Dice Hate Me

Intro and Welcome:

Chris Kirkman from Dice Hate Me joins us this week!

Whatcha been playing?:

Chris has been playing at Origins: Carnival, Compounded, Take the Bait, Over the Road, Awesome Possum, Princes of the Dragon Throne, VivaJava

Jason has been playing: Settlers of CatanCatan Dice

Rob has been playing: Cards Against Humanity

Mechanic of the Week:

Worker Placement

Other games we mentioned:

Stone Age

Sentinels of the Multiverse

Formula D

Carcassonne

Troyes

Lucky Dice

Garden Dice

Practicing the Pitch:

Chris Kirkman talks about designing games with Cherilyn Joy Lee Kirkman and others.

Plugs:

Soap Box Derby

The Great Heart Land Hauling Company 

@dicehateme

@Monkey238

Episode 7: A Season of Love and Zesty Breakfast Burritos

Intro and Welcome:

Still enamored by making a podcast

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Book of Heroes

Rob has been playing: Shut the BoxCards Against Humanity, Quadefy and Dragon’s Dogma

Mechanic of the Week:

Wagering and Betting

Jason keeps trying to talk about Bidding.

Other games we mentioned:

Gravediggers

Blind Man’s Bluff

Texas Hold ’em

Liar’s Dice

Gambling? I’m in!

Practicing the Pitch:

Jason pitches Kingdom Seasons

Plugs:

Dresden Files

Gencon

Kingdom Seasons

A board game for 2-4 players.

Throughout the game players earn prestige.  At the end of the game the Kingdom with the highest prestige wins.  The game ends when the final season card is flipped.

Each player controls a kingdom which is represented by a castle.

Your game board would have your castle and surrounding lands on it.  The boards would be double sided so that you could choose which one you wanted, it would mean up to 8 choices for your castle.  The boards would be designed to match up with each other in the middle.

The goal is for your Kingdom to take over the world and become the Grand Emperor by any means necessary.  War, spies, alliances, intrigue all of these could be mechanics.

Each Kingdom is better at different things and has different assets and different favored seasons and different speciality commodities.

Key Mechanics:

Season Cards:  Every so many turns you reveal a new season card and it tells what the next season will be like. For instance seasons of war, famine, plague, love, insurrection, magic, valor and the like.  These cards change everything in the game when they are shown, market prices, travel times and more.  When the last season passes the game ends.

Commodities: There will be several types of commodities in the game, including Horses, Weapon, Food, Magic, people, etc.

Marketplace: The marketplace is a central location that you can trade commodities.  The commodities are limited to what has been traded in and what has been stocked based on season.

Land Claiming: Commodities can also be taken tribes and villages within the kingdoms.  To do this you would either have to forcibly takeover the area or by bribing the people there.

– Jason

All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

 

Episode 6: Beautiful Monsters and the Barter System

Intro and Welcome:

Dragon’s Milk

Bill Cosby and other stuff not worth mentioning

David from The Podge Cast is awesome

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Wasabi

Rob has been playing: Dragon’s Dogma

Mechanic of the Week:

Using Barter Systems in games

Fast Paced Games

Other games we mentioned:

Settlers of Catan

Monopoly

Pit

Blink

War

Bananagrams

Jason’s Zombie Card Game Idea

Rummy

Sentinels of the Multiverse

Stone Age

Lawless

Carcassonne

Pompeii

Cheap Ass Games

Unexploded Cattle

Kill Doctor Lucky (Not a Cheap Ass game, Rob was right)

Kill Doctor Lucky (The Cheap Ass game… Jason was right too)

Battle Cattle

Poo

Practicing the Pitch:

Rob pitches Monster Pageant

Plugs:

Jennisodes

Five Finger Tees

Monster Pageant

Competitive card game for 2 to 4 players
In this Rummy-style game each player takes on the roll of a horrifying monster, competing in a beauty pageant to see who can be crowned foulest of them all!  Tear, claw, maul and chomp as hard as you can to collect as many accessories as possible to make your creature the prettiest.  In the end, whoever wins the most events (swimsuit, talent, eveningwear, etc.) will be crowed Miss Monster!

Game features:

Eight different monsters to choose from:  Vampire, Mummy, Ghost, Ogre, MerMaid, Succubus, and more!
Eight Pageant Events:  Swimsuit, Talent, Eveningwear, Interview, Cage Fight, Peasant Hunt, and more!
Dozens of accessories to wear:  French Manicured Claws, Necklace of Severed Fingers,
Razor-Sharp Stiletto Heels, Thorned Tiara, and many many more!
Just because you’re a monster doesn’t mean you can’t be beautiful too!
– Rob
All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 5: Sandboxes and Mini Golf

Intro and Welcome:

Henry Winkler

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Castle

Rob has been playing: Minecraft

Mechanic of the Week:

Sandbox games and their implications with board games.

Other games we mentioned:

Utara

Practicing the Pitch:

Jason pitches Par for the Course

Plugs:

EricVansingel.com

@D20Blonde

#RPGCHAT

 

 

Par for the Course

Par for the Course is designed to be a fun family game where your goal is to build miniature golf holes and then play through them getting the lowest score possible.  The game can either be played competitively, as a solo game, trying to beat par or as co-op game trying to collectively beat par.

This is a tile board game for 2-6 players.

The game ends after either 9 or 18 holes.

The winner is the player with the lowest score.

Each turn tiles are used to build a miniature golf hole made up of a starting tile, 6-8 course tiles and a hole tile.

Components: (Proposed)

72 square tiles

8 Character cards

40 putting cards

6 golf ball tokens

1 golf score pad

1d6

Key mechanics:

Building: To build a golf hole each player will have a pool of 7 tiles to choose from that other players cannot see.  From there the tee off tile get placed and players take turns laying down tiles to a total of 6-8 depending on the number of players.  Finally, the hole tile is placed.

Characters: Each player will use a different character that has their own deck of 5 cards to help them putt the ball.

Putting: To putt, the player rolls 1D6 and then plays up to 2 of the cards from their character deck.  They then take that total and they “Count” the tiles to see where their ball lands.

Tiles: Each tile has a different value from -3 all the way up to +6.  To get throw a tile the player’s putting score (1D6 + the cards they play) must equal or exceed that value.  Once they player’s ball reaches a tile that they cannot beat, the ball stops there.

Please let me know your thoughts!

– Jason

All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 4: Interstellar Wormholes and Delicious Fudge

Intro and Welcome:

Mackinac Island

Moo Joos

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Forbidden Island

Rob has been playing: Quadefy

 

Mechanic of the Week:

Characters with unique abilities in board games and card games.

Other games we mentioned:

Bang

Bone Wars

Carcassonne

Citadels

Civilization

Lawless

Sentinels of the Multiverse

Settlers of Catan

Small World

Practicing the Pitch:

Rob Pitches Wormholes

Plugs:

Geeta Games Kickstarter: Lilly Looking Through

Mackinac Island Fudge

Wormholes

Competitive tile-based game for 2 to 6 players.

The universe is big.  VERY big.  Getting from place to place can take some time.  That’s where you come in.  You’re an alien with a fleet of flying saucers.  Your job is to tunnel wormholes through the fabric of space itself, making interstellar travel easier, safer and faster.  And any time you can gather some energy by swinging those wormholes past and around nearby planets and stars, well, that’ll just make the trip that much faster.

In Wormholes, players take turns placing hexagon-shaped tiles on the table, building paths through space.  Wormholes are completed by closing each end with a portal, which allows entry and exit for travelers.  Points are awarded based on the total length of the wormhole (1 point for each tile).

Additional features:

Planets: The gravity of a planet can give anyone traveling through a nearby wormhole a speed boost, also increasing your score for a completed wormhole.
Stars: The incredible gravity of a star will give an even bigger speed boost, giving you an even bigger increase in your score for a completed wormhole.
Nebulas: Nebulas drain energy from your wormhole and spread it into space. Points are lost if your wormhole passes through a nebula.  But a player may also choose to commit one of his saucers to collecting that diffused energy, and in the end gain a bonus.
Improving the Interstellar Infrastructure one Wormhole at a time!
-Rob
All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.