Episode 34: Annisa Jones and We Are The Robots

BTG on iTunes

Intro and Welcome:

Guest Host Annisa Jones

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Hostage Negotiator Prototype

Rob has been playing: Dominion

Annisa has been playing: Takenoko

 

“Mechanic” of the Week:

Puzzles in games

Other Games we mentioned:

Drunk Quest

Mansions of Madness

MindTrap

Munchkin

Redneck Life

Risk Legacy

Practicing the Pitch:

Annisa Pitches her Robots VS Monsters game

Twitter Mentions:

@Tangerini

@vanrydergames

 

 

Episode 33: Pretty Patterns and Augmenters

BTG on iTunes

Intro and Welcome:

Rob and Jason miss each other!

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Sequence

Rob has been playing: Farkle, Name 5, Flip Out

 

“Mechanic” of the Week:

Patterns/Colors/No Text on Cards

Other Games we mentioned:

Flowerfall

 

Lost Cities

 

Practicing the Pitch:

Jason pitches Augmenters.

Plugs:

Pivit

 

-{Augmenters}-

-{Augmenters}-

This game is designed as part of the OSC System that Rob designed.

In this 2 player board game players assume the role of Augmenters, people who add steampunk attachments and weapons to human fighters and then control them as they attempt to destroy one another.

The goal of the game is to destroy your opponents three power sources, which are conveniently mounted on a wall within an arena.  To achieve this goal players control fighters who enter the arena and battle one another all while trying to defend your own power sources.

Each turn players get a set number of action points which allow them to do any of the following:

1. Add an Augment to a fighter:  This involves playing two cards as in the OSC system.  One card is an augment while the other gives the numerical bonus value.

2. Move a fighter in play.

3. Make an attack.

4. Use a special augment ability.

Each action has a different action point cost.

Players may have up to four fighters in play at any given time.

The board in this game is setup primarily as an arena but there are also sections on the side to track the hit points of your fighters and your power sources.

I’m still in the process of really going through this pitch and will give updates and many more details as I work this all out.

-Jason

All ideas presented here are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 32: Odd Men and Splitters

BTG on iTunes

Intro and Welcome:

New Year New Theme Song

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Settlers of Catan

Rob has been playing: Barons of Tea,

 

“Mechanic” of the Week:

Odd Man Out/Variable Player Powers

Other Games we mentioned:

Alcatraz: The Scapegoat

Battlestar Galactica

Forbidden Island

Hero Quest

Mansions of Madness

Small World

 

 

Practicing the Pitch:

Rob pitches Splitters and the OSC System.

 

/Splitters/

/Splitters/
Splitters is a steampunk-themed card game for two players.  In the game, players take on the role of talented mechanics who compete to hack complex steam-powered machine computers known as Difference Engines.  They hack these incredibly complicated constructions by splitting the flow of steam, earning themselves the name, “Splitters”.  The goal is to be the first Splitter to light 10 lights (earn 10 points) on the top of the Difference Engine.
Splitters is played using the Off-Set Card (OSC) System.  The OSC System uses cards printed with off-set imagery.  Actions are taken in OSC games by placing two cards onto the table adjacent to each other, connecting the images of the two different cards together to make one whole card.  For example:

OSCBasicExample

On this turn Player 1 has two cards to play.  The first card is worth 3 points, or has an effect allowing him to draw one additional card.  The second card is worth 2 points, or has an effect of forcing Player 2 to discard one card.  There are two basic ways to combine these cards as shown.  Player 1 can place the first card on the left, and the second card on the right.  That will make a complete image, earning him 3 points while forcing Player 2 to discard one card.  Or Player 1 could swap the cards around, earning him 2 points and allowing him to draw one extra card.
In more advanced play, Player 1 might choose to turn one card around 180 degrees to connect the two points sides to each other, earning him 5 points total.  Or he might connect the two effect sides to each other, allowing him to draw one card and forcing Player 2 to discard one card.  No matter which combination Player 1 chooses, the unconnected sides of the card are not used.
Game components:
Deck of OSC cards
Game board with Point Track and Engine Status track
2 soft point tracking tokens
2 hard point tracking tokens
1 Engine Status tracking token
At the start of a game of Splitters, both players draw 10 cards from the deck and place their point tracking tokens at zero.  On each turn players have two actions available:  Play a card or Discard a card.
Play a card:
Each card laid on the table requires one action.  A card can only be played if it is connected to another card.  Two cards connected are called a “Split”.  Therefore in order to play a Split at the start of the game, a player must use two actions to play two cards.  Later in the game it may be possible to add a card to an existing Split, creating a Split-Chain.  In that event only one action would be needed to play that one card.
Discard a card:
A player is only allowed to have a total of 10 cards available to them at a time during the game (unless a card effect or Engine Status states otherwise).  This limit applies to both cards in the player’s hand as well as cards that have been played on the table.  If the player wishes, they may spend 1 action to discard 1 card from their hand and draw a new one from the deck.  If the player has a Split in play on the table, they may choose to spend 1 action to discard one of those cards and draw a new card to their hand.  If discarding one card from the table breaks a Split and leaves another card orphaned on the table, that card must also be immediately discarded and a new card drawn from the deck and into the hand.  This does not require an extra action to perform.
Players must use both actions on their turn.
After a player has taken their actions, they can immediately move their Soft point token on the game board to account for any points they have gained on their turn.  Soft points are temporary, and are only counted as long as the Splits that earned them are in play.
Some cards allow players to earn Hard points.  Hard points are tracked with the Hard point token.  Hard points are earned when their Splits are played, but are not lost when those Splits are broken.  The Hard point token will shift the Soft point token on the game board.  For example:
Player 2 has a Split worth 3 Soft points in play, and has placed the Soft point token on the game board at 3.  On his next turn he plays a second Split worth 2 Hard points.  He now places his Hard point token on the game board at 2.  The soft point token then moves from 3 to 5, reflecting the total number of points in play.  Next Player 1 plays a Split which forces Player 2 to discard all Splits in play.  Player 2 removes his Soft token from the point tracker, but leaves his Hard token in place at 2.
Engine Status:
As play progresses the status of the Difference Engine will change to reflect the modifications that have been made to it by the players.  These status changes may occur when both players have passed a certain point threshhold, or when a cumulative point total is reached.  Some potential Engine Status effects:
All players have 1 additional action per turn
Players may only have 1 Split or Split-Chain in play
Max hand size increases by 1 card
Max hand size decreases by 1 card
Card Effects:
Some cards have an effect that occurs only the first time it is played in a Split (such as discarding a card, or discarding a Split).  Other cards have ongoing effects that last until their Split is removed from the table (player can use 1 extra action, player can increase their hand size by 1).  All card effects are to be determined.
Point values:
Cards range in value from 0 to 3 points.  The deck size and quantity of each point value is to be determined.
Winning:
After a player has used both of their actions and points are tallied, their turn ends and play moves to the other player.  Play continues to alternate until one player accumulates a total of 10 points.

 

-Rob

All ideas presented here are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 31: BTG 2012 Year in Review

BTG on iTunes

Episode 30: Grant Rodiek and Insurrection

BTG on iTunes

Intro and Welcome:

Special Guest Grant Rodiek.

Whatcha been playing?:

Grant has been playing: Risk Legacy

Jason has been playing: Farmageddon

 

“Mechanic” of the Week:

Team Play

Other Games we mentioned:

1812

Dominoes

Euchre

Lawless

Pinnacle

 

 

Practicing the Pitch:

Grant pitches Insurrection.

He also discussses Empire of York.

Check out his website here.

Twitter Shout outs:

@HerrohGrant

 

Plugs:

Unpub 3 Event!

Bonus Episode 8: Cardboard Edison Interview

On this bonus episode we sit down and chat with Chris and Suzanne Zinsli from Cardboard Edison.

Cardboard Edison Blog

Cardboard Edison Twitter

 

Cardboard Edison Facebook

 

Episode 29: Dirty Money and Standing in Line

BTG on iTunes

Intro and Welcome:

Contest winner Chip Beauvais

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Dominion, Forbidden Island

Rob has been playing: Nightfall

 

“Mechanic” of the Week:

Currency in games

Other Games we mentioned:

Lawless

Magic: The Gathering

Monopoly

Small World

Smash Up

 

Practicing the Pitch:

Chip  pitches Standing in line.

Check out his other game ideas here.

Twitter Shout outs:

@The_FlyingSheep

@BrianLiberge

Plugs:

Unpub 3 Event!