Episode 5: Sandboxes and Mini Golf

Intro and Welcome:

Henry Winkler

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Castle

Rob has been playing: Minecraft

Mechanic of the Week:

Sandbox games and their implications with board games.

Other games we mentioned:

Utara

Practicing the Pitch:

Jason pitches Par for the Course

Plugs:

EricVansingel.com

@D20Blonde

#RPGCHAT

 

 

Par for the Course

Par for the Course is designed to be a fun family game where your goal is to build miniature golf holes and then play through them getting the lowest score possible.  The game can either be played competitively, as a solo game, trying to beat par or as co-op game trying to collectively beat par.

This is a tile board game for 2-6 players.

The game ends after either 9 or 18 holes.

The winner is the player with the lowest score.

Each turn tiles are used to build a miniature golf hole made up of a starting tile, 6-8 course tiles and a hole tile.

Components: (Proposed)

72 square tiles

8 Character cards

40 putting cards

6 golf ball tokens

1 golf score pad

1d6

Key mechanics:

Building: To build a golf hole each player will have a pool of 7 tiles to choose from that other players cannot see.  From there the tee off tile get placed and players take turns laying down tiles to a total of 6-8 depending on the number of players.  Finally, the hole tile is placed.

Characters: Each player will use a different character that has their own deck of 5 cards to help them putt the ball.

Putting: To putt, the player rolls 1D6 and then plays up to 2 of the cards from their character deck.  They then take that total and they “Count” the tiles to see where their ball lands.

Tiles: Each tile has a different value from -3 all the way up to +6.  To get throw a tile the player’s putting score (1D6 + the cards they play) must equal or exceed that value.  Once they player’s ball reaches a tile that they cannot beat, the ball stops there.

Please let me know your thoughts!

– Jason

All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 4: Interstellar Wormholes and Delicious Fudge

Intro and Welcome:

Mackinac Island

Moo Joos

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Forbidden Island

Rob has been playing: Quadefy

 

Mechanic of the Week:

Characters with unique abilities in board games and card games.

Other games we mentioned:

Bang

Bone Wars

Carcassonne

Citadels

Civilization

Lawless

Sentinels of the Multiverse

Settlers of Catan

Small World

Practicing the Pitch:

Rob Pitches Wormholes

Plugs:

Geeta Games Kickstarter: Lilly Looking Through

Mackinac Island Fudge

Wormholes

Competitive tile-based game for 2 to 6 players.

The universe is big.  VERY big.  Getting from place to place can take some time.  That’s where you come in.  You’re an alien with a fleet of flying saucers.  Your job is to tunnel wormholes through the fabric of space itself, making interstellar travel easier, safer and faster.  And any time you can gather some energy by swinging those wormholes past and around nearby planets and stars, well, that’ll just make the trip that much faster.

In Wormholes, players take turns placing hexagon-shaped tiles on the table, building paths through space.  Wormholes are completed by closing each end with a portal, which allows entry and exit for travelers.  Points are awarded based on the total length of the wormhole (1 point for each tile).

Additional features:

Planets: The gravity of a planet can give anyone traveling through a nearby wormhole a speed boost, also increasing your score for a completed wormhole.
Stars: The incredible gravity of a star will give an even bigger speed boost, giving you an even bigger increase in your score for a completed wormhole.
Nebulas: Nebulas drain energy from your wormhole and spread it into space. Points are lost if your wormhole passes through a nebula.  But a player may also choose to commit one of his saucers to collecting that diffused energy, and in the end gain a bonus.
Improving the Interstellar Infrastructure one Wormhole at a time!
-Rob
All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 3: Bike Messengers and Diggin’ Graves

Intro and Welcome:

Delerium-Tremens Beer

Tybo the Carrot Man

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Carnival

Rob has been playing: Gravediggers

Other games we mentioned:

Carcassonne

Settlers of Catan

Formula D

Sentinels of the Multiverse

Cthulhu Dark

Monster and Other Childish Things

A Dirty World

Mechanic of the Week:

Ways to create random events in a game and different ways to achieve goals in game design.

Practicing the Pitch:

Jason Pitches his Bike Messenger game

Plugs:

@theGeekparent

The Geek Parent Podcast

Role Playing Public Radio

Bike Messengers

You are a bike messenger trying to deliver packages in a crazy city.  Your job is to do whatever it takes to make deliveries, even if it means stealing from other messengers and going through dangerous construction zones.  Just try not to crash!

This is a board game for 2-6 players.

The game ends when all deliveries have been made.

The winner is the player with most points from deliveries and gear.

The board consists of 72 hex tiles with each tile being two inches in diameter.  At the beginning of the game, the tiles are randomly placed in the 12 x 6 grid.  Each tile contains 1-2 buildings on average but some contain construction zones, one way streets and other obstacles.

Components: (Proposed)

72 Hex tiles

36 Delivery cards

72 Ride cards

36 Gear Cards

6 bike tokens

2 Custom D6’s

Key mechanics:

Deliveries: These cards are flipped over to the side of the board.  They have a pickup location and a delivery location.  The first player to reach the pick up point can take the delivery card.  They then must get to the delivery in a set number of turns without losing the package.  There is always one less delivery card in play than players in the game.  Players receive points for every delivery they complete.  Each delivery is worth a different number of points.

Gear: Getting gear allows you to move faster and more safely and also make some deliveries others couldn’t.

Stealing: Because there is always a shortage of packages, players are encouraged to steal from one other.

Card Types: (Rough Draft)

Ride: These are all the moves players can make as they travel through the city.  Moves include speed boosts, stealing from others and navigating through construction sites.  These are modified by rolling dice to determine your distance travelled per turn.

Deliveries: These are set deliveries between two buildings worth a set number of points.  Because the board is random, this can make some high point deliveries very easy and some hard deliveries could have very low payoffs.

Gear: Enhancements to your bike that you get as rewards for making deliveries.

Please let me know your thoughts!

– Jason

All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 2: Action Movies and Outlaws

Intro and Welcome:

We’re making a podcast

Rob’s smashed fingers

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Lawless

Rob has been playing: Bone Wars

Other Games we mentioned:

Stone Age

Colosseum

Ogre

Mechanic of the Week:

Scaled Purchasing mechanic in Lawless

Small World

Garden Dice

Practicing the Pitch:

Rob Pitches, Action Movie: The Card Game

Plugs:

Lucky Dice

Timbuk2

 

Action Movie: The Card Game

Competitive card game for 2 to 4 players.

Each player takes on the role of the head of a new movie studio in Hollywood.  The goal of the game is to make the biggest, craziest and most exciting action movies you possibly can for as little money as possible, in the hopes of making tons of money.

The game begins by finding investors and buying a script to produce.  From there you spend the investors’ money to do rewrites on the script, hire actors and a director, and finally shoot the film.  When it’s done you release it to theaters across the world, hoping to break box office records.  But watch out, because if the critics give you bad reviews it may all come crashing down.

Card Types: (a preliminary list)

Investors: Investors will give you money to spend to make your movie, but they always come with a catch.

Scripts: The bigger the script, the more it’ll cost you to buy, and the more potential it has to make you a billionaire

Actors: A-list, B-list and C-list celebrities are all out there and ready to play your heroes or villains, all it takes is a paycheck and a contract

Crew:  Directors, designers, cinematographers: Hire the right ones and they’ll make your movie better

Scenes: Explosions, car chases, gun battles, and more explosions: audiences like to see things blow up

Miscellaneous: Pay the writer to let you add scenes, bribe a critic to give you a good review or give a rival studio a bad one, these cards allow you to bend and break the rules… for a price

In Hollywood, film is forever, but money is all that matters.

– Rob

All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.

Episode 1: Pilot and Zombies

Intro and Welcome:

What is building the game?

Whatcha been playing?:

Jason has been playing: Stone Age

Rob has been playing: Carcassonne

Other games we mentioned:

Settlers of Catan

Citadels

Garden Dice

Sentinels of the Multiverse

Bang

Small World

Mechanic of the Week:

Tile Games

Carcassonne

Castle Ravenloft

Civilization

Living Labyrinth

Castle Keep

Practicing the Pitch:

Jason Pitches his Zombie strategy card game

Plugs:

Sentinels of the Multiverse

Lilly Looking Through Demo

Zombie Card Game

Can you survive the zombie apocalypse?  This game aims to answer that question!  To survive in this hostile environment you will have to balance defending your hideout with gathering food and other supplies and still you must deal with the ever-growing horde of zombies trying to get into your hideout and eat your brains.  Each turn involves splitting survivors between, defending/enhancing the hideout, clearing out zombies around your hideout and sending out scouts to find new supplies and survivors.

This card game is designed for 2-4 players.

The game ends when there is only on player alive with at least one survivor within their hideout!

Components: (Proposed)

100 Zombie cards

24 Hideout cards

24 Survivor cards

100 Scout cards

4 D20’s

4 D6’s

Key mechanics:

Food: Each turn you will need to feed your survivors out of your food stores, if at any time you run out one of your survivors will die.  You start with a small amount of food and must send out scouts to collect more.

Being Wounded:  If one of your survivors is wounded by a zombie then you must decide whether to keep the survivor and chance infection or if you should just discard the survivor from play.  If you choose to keep the survivor then you will have to make a roll to determine if they turn into a zombie.  If they do then you must defend against them while they attempt to eat the other survivors in your hideout.  If however they pass the roll and do not turn, they survive and continue on as normal.

Card Types: (Rough Draft)

Hideouts:  There are several unique hideouts in the game.  Each one provides different strengths and weaknesses.  Each hideout has a number of slots for adding enhancements.  These items may be defenses, Food growth or other things as well.  At the start of the game you draw 4 hideouts and then choose one to be your hideout.  Examples: Police Station, Church and the Outdoor Adventures Store.

Survivors: There are 24 unique survivor cards in the game.  Each possesses different skills and attributes for attacking and defending against zombies.  At the start of the game each player randomly draws 3 survivors.  Examples: Survivalist, Riot Cop, Horror Film Geek, Lumberjack and Mailman.

Zombies: The game will contain a large deck of Zombie cards.  Each zombie will have a base attack and some will have special skills that make them more or less dangerous.  Examples: Wandering Zombie, Buff Zombie and Legless Zombie.

Hideout Enhancements: These help you make your hideout more defendable or increase food supply among other things.  Without enhancements your hideout will not stand a chance at holding back the zombie horde that keeps growing outside.  Examples: Barbed Wire, Wooden Fence, Cow and Bulldozer.

Weapons: These can be equipped by your survivors to help them defend your hideout, fight zombies and also scout.  Examples: Meat Cleaver, Golf Club, Machine gun and Flamethrower.

Action Cards: These allow you to do many different things and can be played during the action phase of any player.  Some of the cards help you while some hurt other players.  Examples: Food Shortage, Mutiny, Die Hard and Go Dark.

Additional: When scouting you can also come across extra food, marauders, or other survivors as well.

Please let me know your thoughts!

– Jason

All ideas presented on this site are the property of the Building the Game Podcast.